Support for children aged 0-25 with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

Are you ready to work?

What does “ready to work” mean? It means understanding what types of job would be interesting, knowing how to find a job, and getting the help and advice needed to be able to get a job.

There are many ways to prepare for the world of work, including speaking to;

  • teachers
  • advisors at college
  • employment advisors

You can also look at information on websites, such as The Preparing for Adulthood Routes into Work guide.

The National Development team for Inclusion (NDTi) has developed a Vocational Profile Workbook which helps young people and adults think about what type of work they might enjoy and what help they may need.

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What types of jobs can people with SEND do?

The answer to this question is the same as for those without SEND, so any job that you have the skills for or determination and ability to learn.

Some young people and adults with SEND may experience finding a job and learning new skills more difficult than for those without SEND, but with support from family, friends, services and high quality information and advice, everyone that wants to work should be enabled to.

There are lots of interesting videos you can watch to see and hear about young people with SEND who are in employment, for instance on Youtube.

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Types of help people with SEND can get to find a job or stay in a job

The Access to Work grant can pay for:

  • special equipment, adaptations or support worker services to help you do things like answer the phone or go to meetings
  • help getting to and from work

There are local services that can also help:

  • Job Centre Plus has specialist advisors to help young people and adults with special educational needs and disabilities find work.

You may also be eligible for support from the Work and Health Programme or Intensive Personalised Employment Support.

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Will the work be paid?

Not all work that people choose to do is paid. Volunteering (working without being paid) can help you get experience, learn new skills, and build confidence in working with other people. This might be in the area of work that you want to do in the future or in a different type of work that will help you learn new skills that will be useful for you in the future.

Paid work is what most people want to get as this will give you an income (money) and enable you to be more independent. Everyone that wants to work and has the ability to work, should be supported to gain paid employment.

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Related information
Useful Websites